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Dr Daniel Longman

Dr Daniel Longman

Post-doctoral Researcher in Human Evolution

Biological Anthropology
Pembroke Street

Cambridge CB2 3QG

Biography:

Education:

2011-2014: PhD, University of Cambridge

2008-9: MPhil Human Evolution, University of Cambridge

2005-8: BA Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge

 

Research Interests

During periods of energetic stress, biological functions cannot be individually optimised.  Life history theory predicts the existence of trade-offs between competing functional processes, with preferential allocation to tissues and functions offering the greatest immediate survival value. I have developed and validated a novel model, which utilises the energy deficit inherent in ultra-endurance athletic events to study these trade-offs. My work within the ADaPt Project (PI: Dr Jay Stock) has involved the collection of physiological samples and data from athletes taking part in ocean rows and foot-races in the world’s most challenging climates. It is our hope that this project will further understanding of the life history trade-offs, promoting evolutionary understanding of our adaptive capabilities as a phenotypically plastic species.  The implications for performance in extreme environments are also considered.

Teaching

I am involved in the teaching/examining of the following courses:

Undergraduate:

BAN6 Human Variation and Adaptation

BAN7 Advanced Behaviour

ARC7 Death and Burial

Postgraduate:

MPhil Human Evolutionary Studies

 

Other Professional Activities

Research Associate, Corpus Christi College

Member of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists

 

Keywords

  • The Body

Key Publications

Most of the papers below can be found on Academia or Research Gate. Alternatively, please  for an electronic copy.

[1]   Longman, D., Surbey, M.K., Stock, J.T., & Wells, J.C.K. (2018) Physical dominance or all in the mind? Experimentally induced tandem androgenic and psychological shifts in male reproductive effort following competitive "win" or "loss". Human Nature.

[2]   Longman, D., Stock, J.T. & Wells, J.C.K.  (2017). A trade-off between physical and cognitive performance, with relative preservation of brain function.  Scientific Reports

[3]   Longman, D.,  Prall, S.P., Shattuck, E.C., Stephen, I.D., Stock, J.T., Wells, J.C.k., & Muehlenbein, M.P. (2017). Short-term resource allocation during extensive athletic competition.  American Journal of Human Biology.

[4]   Longman, D., Wells, J.C.K., & Stock, J.T. (2015). Can persistence hunting signal male quality?  Having versus getting: a test using endurance athletes.  PLoS ONE. 10.4

[5]   Longman, D., Hutchinson, J.C., Stock, J.T., & Wells, J.C.K. (2014). Attentional strategies during rowing. Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences. 10:321-331.

[6]   Longman, D., Stock, J.T., & Wells, J.C.K. (2011). Digit ratio (2D:4D) and rowing ergometer  performance in males and females. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 144 (3), 337-341.

[7]   Longman, D., Stock, J.T., & Wells, J.C.K. (2011). Fluctuating asymmetry as a predictor for rowing ergometer performance. International Journal of Sports Medicine. 32 (8), 606-610.